Bucky F*ucking Dent by David Duchovny (5 out of 5)

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I wait for the day this man writes his memoirs. I DO hope it’s on the list. Then again, he treasures his privacy and probably wouldn’t make those memories public. You have to respect that. You know, I’m biased because I LOVE David Duchovny. I really liked Holy Cow, his first fiction book that came out last year, and I loved this one- although for a host of different reasons. As I was reading this book- similar to when I was reading Holy Cow (although that was different because Elsie is a female, and David is NOT), I could hear his voice narrating the book. I told my coworker Andrew this, and he said he could see that, having snuck a peek at the book. That made it even easier to read. There’s a love of baseball here, but more importantly, there’s the love between a son and his dying father. That, given my situation at home with my dad, hits hard. There were points reading this where I had to set it down because it made me cry. Sometimes, it’s cathartic to have a book do that for you. This book is such a book. Of course, you have the trademark Duchovny humor. The same sort you would imagine if you engage him in a Twitter conversation about politics, for example. (Or he takes to Twitter to expound on a book that he loved and that deserves major kudos- “The Cant-idates” by Craig Tomashoff, for the record). But you also have the unusual feat of a fictional book with a highly unusual premise grabbing your attention with the lead characters, and keeping that attention until the end of the book. It’s a book you should pick up and gift your own father with on Father’s Day. Seriously- my first post closer to Father’s Day is going to be a gift guide for books for Father’s Day…. and not the atypical “BBQ”, “golf”, etc. books…different books. This book is out now. Go grab a copy from your closest bookstore.

Ted lives with his battery operated goldfish. He’s an Ivy League grad who took a turn down a different road- to the ballpark, where he plays Mr. Peanut at Yankee Stadium, while waiting for the ghost of the next great American novel to visit him. He gets a phone call telling him that his estranged father Marty is dying of lung cancer, so he packs up and moves home. It quickly becomes apparent that Marty is THE die-hard Boston Red Sox fan, and every time his Red Sox lose, his condition takes a turn for the worse. Ted, battling between his grief at his father’s worsening health and attempting to be the good son and take care of his dad in his waning days, comes up with the harebrain scheme to end all harebrain schemes. With the help of the neighborhood friends and his dad’s grief counselor, he stages the illusion of a Boston Red Sox winning season (this takes place during the Carter presidency, when the BoSox were in the same dregs as the Chicago Cubs. They had not yet seen the glory of that World Series ring), to get his father to rally. Things, as you can guess, don’t quite go according to plan. And that, my friends, is why this book is so incredibly easy to get into and stay into. I can’t tell enough people how great of a read it is, and how quirky and yet quietly heartbreaking in others. But don’t just listen to me- go get a copy!

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~ by generationgbooks on April 15, 2016.

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